January 13, 2019

Despite the absence of soldiers and guns, the worldwide fight against cancer can truly be classified as a war, with annual casualties rising past 14 million annually. Despite the urgent need to provide a solution to this horrendous epidemic, many large pharmaceutical companies are faced with a conflict of interest between promoting the treatments that are most effective and promoting those that make the most money.    

Winning the War on Cancer details Sylvie Beljanski’s fight against the medical system as she continues her father’s scientific work. Sylvie’s father, Mirko Beljanski, discovered a miraculous natural cure to cancer that specifically targets cancerous cells. Pao pereira and Rauwolfia vomitoria both fight several types of cancer with astounding efficacy without all of the harmful side effects of radiation and chemotherapy. One would think that the medical community would enthusiastically accept such a successful natural cure, but that is not the case. Natural remedies are not patentable, so there is not much money to be made. Rather, Mirko Beljanski was arrested and persecuted for his work by the French government. After Mirko Beljanski’s arrest and untimely death, Sylvie promises to continue his work in America, despite being a lawyer with no medical background. She faces the struggles of finding the products and necessary equipment, convincing specialists of the legitimacy of of father’s studies, and battling through the legal battles against the French government as she embarks on what she has dubbed “the craziest idea ever”.

Sylvie Beljanski’s writing perfectly balances scientific explanations with her personal storyline. She explains how she discovered that people weren’t only interested in the facts and figures but also the incredible story of her and her father. I liked that this book shares specific details about the professional studies conducted on the plant extracts, as well as sharing personal, and often amusing stories of Sylvie’s life.

I went into this book as a skeptic, unsure how a miracle plant drug could cure every type of cancer. However, I believe that the Beljanskis have provided enough scientific evidence to prove that these products are legitimately useful. During his life, Mirko Beljanski wrote 133 scientific publications, and since his passing, the extracts have passed several clinical trials, including studies published by the Columbia University Medical Center. Additionally, the Pao pereira and Rauwolfia vomitoria extracts work equally well with radiation and chemotherapy treatment and are not meant to be used as a replacement. It is absolutely frustrating to read how the FDA can not recognize these supplements despite the number of professional academic studies the prove that these drugs work, making it illegal to state that these drugs can care cancer, despite the fact that they actually can.

If modern science was born out of the struggle between Galileo and the authorities for the right to express scientific ideas, not much progress has been made since the 16th century, either in France, the self-proclaimed champion of human rights, or in the United States, the first modern democracy! 
– page 1777

As someone who doesn’t know much, if anything, about the medical field, I still found this book extremely interesting. I would recommend it to anyone who is curious about the natural remedy industry, as well as those who have suffered through, or know someone who suffered through cancer. I rate this book a four out of four due to the exceptional writing.